Left in the dark film reviews and essays

With any luck, “The Dark Tower” could be a solid box-office performer (at least, for a weekend), yet the picture’s no-frills design raises an interesting question: Would it be a more commercial movie if it were an ambitious, two-hours-plus sprawl that tried to stay digressively true to the layered weight of King’s novels? My instinct says that no, that movie would have been a slog. “The Dark Tower” works as a film because it’s not trying to be a multiverse — and because, in its forgettable derivative ballistic way, it packs in just enough of the King vision to remind you that everything old can be new again, especially if it wasn’t all that novel the first time.

Leonard Nimoy was confirmed as the voice actor for Sentinel Prime in March 2011. [35] Nimoy, who had previously voiced Galvatron in 1986's The Transformers: The Movie and was married to Michael Bay's cousin Susan, had previously been under consideration for The Fallen 's voice in Revenge of the Fallen , but Bay had been hesitant for fear of offending his relative with the relatively low pay allotted to voice actors. [36] Even though Nimoy openly asked Bay to simply give him a call, [37] it ultimately never worked out, and The Fallen was voiced by Tony Todd instead. For Dark of the Moon , Bay finally overcame his anxiety and hired Nimoy, who accepted the offer. [38] In return, screenwriter Ehren Kruger included several nods to Nimoy's well-known character as Mr. Spock from Star Trek in the movie. [39] Dark of the Moon would be Nimoy's final performance in the Transformers franchise before his death in early 2015.

Left in the dark film reviews and essays

left in the dark film reviews and essays

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